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Hudson Miniatures 1902 Franklin Old Timers, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good+

$85   

Dated 1949 and highly detailed for that time. Early multi-media kit consist of numerous die-cut, saw cut and machined wood parts, beautiful plastic wheels, steering wheel, lanterns, metal parts and stock, die-cut card stock and large, excellent plans/instructions. Includes full size plans and instructions. This kit has never been started. The small parts are still factory bag sealed, and all others have been inventoried 100%. Complete with full-size plans and instructions. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1900 Packard Roadster Old Timers, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$85   

Dated 1949 and highly detailed for that time. Large-scale model measures 6.5 inches long when built. Early multi-media kit consist of numerous die-cut, saw cut and machined wood parts, beautiful plastic wheels, steering wheel, lanterns, metal parts and stock, die-cut card stock and large, excellent plans/instructions. Includes full size plans and instructions. This kit has never been started. The small parts are still factory bag sealed, and all others have been inventoried 100%. Complete with full-size plans and instructions. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Fador 1905 White Steamer, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG+

$75   

Dated November of 1949. Very well detailed for that time. Features a large number of die-cut, machined and saw cut wooden parts as well as excellent plastic wheels, headlights, steering wheel, horn and lanterns. There are also metal parts, metal stock and die-cut cardstock parts. Includes full-size, superb fold-out instructions with multiple elevation drawings, numerous detail drawings and templates, two photos of the completed model and extensive instructions. The kit has never been started. Inventoried with all parts present. Fador was another maker of big 1/16 classic cars, like Hudson Miniatures. The full name was Fador Mfg. Company and the address was 501E. Clinton St., Elmira, NY. It appears that Hudson beat Fador to the scene by a year; Hudson's spectacular product line growth starting in 1948 may have influenced Fador in the choice of subject and scale. Fador called the line 'Smallersters' and the design of the kits is very similar. Fortunately, Fador chose completely different vehicles. Because of their great decisions, these are often the only model kits ever made of these historical cars. There is no record of Fador making any plastic kits; the introduction and overwhelming popularity of the Highway Pioneers and the other kits that quickly followed may have driven them out of the market as it did many other wood manufactures. In 1949 the Fador line consisted of a 1909 Hupmobile Roadster, 1904 Cadillac Runabout, 1905 REO 4 Passenger Runabout and one kit that was "3 In 1' - it made one of the following: 1909 EMF Single Rear Seater, 1909 EMF Touring or EMF Roadster. The Baker Electric kit was introduced in 1950 and possibly others as well.

Fador 1905 REO Runabout, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG++

$69   

Rare kit dated 1949. Very well detailed for that time. Big-scale model features numerous die-cut, machined and saw-cut wooden parts, excellent plastic wheels, grill, steering wheel, lanterns and horn, other metal parts and metal stock and die-cut cardstock parts. Come with superb, large fold out plans that show four elevations drawings, many various detail drawings, a photo of the finished model and extensive text instructions. The kit has never been started. The small parts are still factory bag sealed and the parts that were never sealed have been inventoried complete. Fador was another maker of big 1/16 classic cars, like Hudson Miniatures. The full name was Fador Mfg. Company and the address was 501E. Clinton St., Elmira, NY. It appears that Hudson beat Fador to the scene by a year; Hudson's spectacular product line growth starting in 1948 may have influenced Fador in the choice of subject and scale. Fador called the line 'Smallersters' and the design of the kits is very similar. Fortunately, Fador chose completely different vehicles. Because of their great decisions, these are often the only model kits ever made of these historical cars. There is no record of Fador making any plastic kits; the introduction and overwhelming popularity of the Highway Pioneers and the other kits that quickly followed may have driven them out of the market as it did many other wood manufactures.

Hudson Miniatures 1911 Brush Model C Delivery Old Timers, 1/16

Wood and Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$75   

Dated 1949. Large scale and very well detailed for that time. Features numerous die-cut and machined/cut to shape wooden parts, beautiful plastic wheels, grill, steering wheel, lights and other accessories, metal louvered hood, metal stock and parts and die-cut cardstock. Although all of Hudson's 1/16 kits are excellent, this one has even more detail than usual thanks to Hudson's engineers having access to the actual car owned by Mr. Austin Clark. This kit has never been started. The small parts are still factory bag sealed while the parts that were never sealed have been inventoried complete including two sheets of excellent plans/instructions. The Brush Delivery Model C was manufactured by Brush Runabout Company, which was a division of the famous United States Motors. It sold for $650 and was powered by a one cylinder 64 HP engine linked to a gear-set type two speed + reverse multiple disc clutch transmission. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1906 Columbia Electric Old Timers, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG+

$85   

Dated 1949 and very well detailed for that time. Big scale kit features numerous die-cut and machined-to-shape wooden parts, beautiful plastic wheels, leaf spring assemblies and lanterns and a number of metal parts, accessories and die-cut cardstock. The kit has never been started. The small parts are still in the factory sealed bag and all other parts have been inventoried present. Includes large, excellent, detailed plans with instructions. The Columbia Electric was manufactured by the Electric Vehicle Co. of Hartford, Conn. It had a 1.5 HP motor with chain drive and three speeds. It cost $1350 in 1906 and tipped the scales at 1660 pounds. We think of electric cars as 'new' today but they are anything but. There were many advantages (and manufacturers) of these cars. There were no fuel lines and radiators to freeze in the winter and no overheating in the summer. They used no smelly gasoline and produced no odor when operated. The complete lack of noise made them popular with the ladies and the range was between 40 and 50 miles on a charge - not bad at all considering you could not very far anyway (on regular business or errands) in 1906. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1904 Oldsmobile Curved Dash Old Timers, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Exc

$75   

Dated 1949 and very well detailed for that time. Big scale kit features numerous die-cut and machined-to-shape wooden parts, beautiful plastic wheels and lanterns and a small number of metal parts, accessories and die-cut cardstock. The kit has never been started. The small parts are still in the factory sealed bag and all other parts have been inventoried present. Includes large, excellent, detailed plans with instructions. The 1904 Oldsmobile was the first production car in America and was considered very dependable. To emphasize its simplicity and dependability, Oldsmobile invented the slogan 'Nothing to Watch but the Road.' Gus Edward's hit song of 1905, 'In My Merry Oldsmobile' was a tribute to the popularity of the car. It was powered by a single cylinder engine of 4.5 horsepower. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1903 Rambler Old Timers, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG++

$89   

Very well detailed large 1/16 kit from 1949. Features plastic wheels, lights, other accessories and wooden main parts and occasionally metal parts and cardstock. Although all of Hudson's 1/16 kits have excellent detail, this one has even more detail than usual thanks to Hudson's engineers having access to the actual car. This kit has never been started. It has been inventoried complete with all parts, plans and instructions. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1903 Rambler Old Timers, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$85   

Very well detailed large 1/16 kit from 1949. Features plastic wheels, lights, other accessories and wooden main parts and occasionally metal parts and cardstock. Although all of Hudson's 1/16 kits have excellent detail, this one has even more detail than usual thanks to Hudson's engineers having access to the actual car. The small parts are still factory bag sealed and the other parts have been inventoried complete with all parts, plans and instructions. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1910 Stanley Steamer Old Timers, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Exc

$89   

Very well detailed large 1/16 kit from 1949. Features plastic wheels, grill, steering wheel, lights and other accessories and wooden main parts. Although all of Hudson's 1/16 kits have excellent detail, this one has even more detail than usual thanks to Hudson's engineers having access to the actual car. This kit has never been started. The small parts are still factory bag sealed and all other parts have been inventoried complete with all parts, plans and instructions. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1910 Ford Model T Torpedo Convertible, 1/16

Wood and Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good-

$69   

Dated 1949 and highly detailed for that time. Large-scale model measures 8 inches long when built. Early multi-media kit consist of numerous die-cut, saw cut and machined wood parts, beautiful plastic wheels, headlights, steering wheel, horn, lanterns and grill, metal parts and stock, die-cut card stock and large, excellent plans/instructions. This kit has never been started. The small parts are still factory bag sealed, and all other have been inventoried 100% complete with full-size plans and instructions. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1911 Brush Model C Delivery Old Timers, 1/16

Wood and Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good-

$69   

Dated 1949. Large scale and very well detailed for that time. Features numerous die-cut and machined/cut to shape wooden parts, beautiful plastic wheels, grill, steering wheel, lights and other accessories, metal louvered hood, metal stock and parts and die-cut cardstock. Although all of Hudson's 1/16 kits are excellent, this one has even more detail than usual thanks to Hudson's engineers having access to the actual car owned by Mr. Austin Clark. This kit has never been started. The small parts are still factory bag sealed while the parts that were never sealed have been inventoried complete including two sheets of excellent plans/instructions. The Brush Delivery Model C was manufactured by Brush Runabout Company, which was a division of the famous United States Motors. It sold for $650 and was powered by a one cylinder 64 HP engine linked to a gear-set type two speed + reverse multiple disc clutch transmission. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1906 Columbia Electric Old Timers, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good-

$79   

Dated 1949 and very well detailed for that time. Big scale kit features numerous die-cut and machined-to-shape wooden parts, beautiful plastic wheels, leaf spring assemblies and lanterns and a number of metal parts, accessories and die-cut cardstock. The kit has never been started. The small parts are still in the factory sealed bag and all other parts have been inventoried present. Includes large, excellent, detailed plans with instructions. The Columbia Electric was manufactured by the Electric Vehicle Co. of Hartford, Conn. It had a 1.5 HP motor with chain drive and three speeds. It cost $1350 in 1906 and tipped the scales at 1660 pounds. We think of electric cars as 'new' today but they are anything but. There were many advantages (and manufacturers) of these cars. There were no fuel lines and radiators to freeze in the winter and no overheating in the summer. They used no smelly gasoline and produced no odor when operated. The complete lack of noise made them popular with the ladies and the range was between 40 and 50 miles on a charge - not bad at all considering you could not very far anyway (on regular business or errands) in 1906. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1903 Rambler Old Timers, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good-

$79   

Very well detailed large 1/16 kit from 1949. Features plastic wheels & lights, a large number of wooden parts cut/turned to shape and occasionally metal parts and cardstock. Although all of Hudson's 1/16 kits have excellent detail, this one has even more detail than usual thanks to Hudson's engineers having access to the actual car. This kit has never been started. Inventoried complete with all parts, plans and instructions. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1909 Stanley Steamer Old Timers, 1/16

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$79   

Very well detailed large 1/16 kit from 1949. Features plastic wheels, grill, steering wheel, lights and other accessories and wooden main parts. Although all of Hudson's 1/16 kits have excellent detail, this one has even more detail than usual thanks to Hudson's engineers having access to the actual car. This kit has never been started. The small parts are still factory bag sealed and all other parts have been inventoried complete with all parts, plans and instructions. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Hudson Miniatures 1911 Brush Model C Delivery Old Timers, 1/16

Wood and Plastic Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good+

$79   

Dated 1949. Large scale and very well detailed for that time. Features numerous die-cut and machined/cut to shape wooden parts, beautiful plastic wheels, grill, steering wheel, lights and other accessories, metal louvered hood, metal stock and parts and die-cut cardstock. Although all of Hudson's 1/16 kits are excellent, this one has even more detail than usual thanks to Hudson's engineers having access to the actual car owned by Mr. Austin Clark. This kit has never been started. The small parts are still factory bag sealed while the parts that were never sealed have been inventoried complete including two sheets of excellent plans/instructions. The Brush Delivery Model C was manufactured by Brush Runabout Company, which was a division of the famous United States Motors. It sold for $650 and was powered by a one cylinder 64 HP engine linked to a gear-set type two speed + reverse multiple disc clutch transmission. Hudson Miniatures created a very popular line of automobile kits in a constant 1/16 scale shortly after WWII. The kits sold very well...so well that you could argue that Gowland & Gowland borrowed Hudson's subject matter for their ground-breaking 'Highway Pioneers.' The Hudson Miniatures 'Old Timers' even spawned a line of imitators, with Fador's 'Smallster' being one of the better in quality. Sales did drop on the appearance and popularity of the much smaller (and less accurate) Gowland/Revell 'Highway Pioneers' in 1951. When the all-injection molded Gowland kits proved not to be a passing fad, Hudson quickly planned and released his own all-plastic, small-scale competition called 'Lil' Old Timers Quickie Kits.' The kits were of excellent quality, but it was too little too late. Additionally, sales of the excellent wooden kits faltered further in the next few years with the introduction of accurate, 1/24 and 1/32 all-plastic cars in the mid 1950s. This forced Hudson to discontinue the wood kits and the plastic line was sold to Revell and subsequently re-released. Today, these excellent, big 1/16 kits are often the only model available of these early automobiles. In the mid 1960s Aurora thought so highly of Hudson Miniatures that they purchased the wood kit assets and released a very small number of these in all-plastic models.

Strombecker 155mm Gun and Carriage - Heavy Artillery, 1/19, A71

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good

$145   

Very Rare. Date unknown but is likely from the late 1930s or early 1940s. Large and very highly detailed for that time. And excellent pre-fabricated hardwood kit that contains all pre-cut and shaped wood parts, completely finished and machined wheels, beautifully turned gun barrel that is one foot long, sandpaper, CASCO glue, hardware and two pages (front and back of one) of illustrated instructions. Never started and inventoried complete with all parts.

DIY 1920 Rolls Royce Fire Engine

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Good+

$24   

Wood kit that is probably imported from Hong Kong or similar in the late 1980s or early 1990s. Large - measures 15 inches long All parts are hardwood and cut to shape; the spoke wheels are factory assembled while you built all the rest. Although it is a nice kit (the photos show the completed model), I would describe it as 'semi-scale.' The kit has never been started. The parts are still in the internal factory sealed bags and includes illustrated instructions.

Merco T41 Walker Bulldog, 1/27

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: VG+

$69   

Early 1950s wood and metal static model. Well detailed for that time and 12 inches long when assembled. Features precut and die-cut wooden parts, completely formed wheels, many metal parts, full decals and more. Has very large, excellent plans that are highly illustrated and have detailed text instructions also. Never started and complete with all parts and plans/instructions. Merco was Mercury Model Airplane Company out of Brooklyn New York. The armor line included the Patton, T41 bulldog, M4 Sherman, German Tiger, Russian Stalin and the shorter Patton 48.

Merco General Patton Battle Tank, 1/27

Wood Model Kit,   Box Condition: Fair

$55   

Early 1950s wood and metal static model. Well detailed for that time and just over 14 inches long when assembled. Features precut and die-cut wooden parts, completely formed wheels, metal engine screen material, metal tracks and a bag of many other metal parts, full decals and more. Has very large, excellent plans that are highly illustrated and have detailed text instructions also. Never started and complete, with the small parts still in the factory sealed bag. Merco was Mercury Model Airplane Company out of Brooklyn New York. The armor line included the Patton, T41 bulldog, M4 Sherman, German Tiger, Russian Stalin and the shorter Patton 48.